Saturday, January 14, 2012

At what fork in the road,
what moment in time,
do we lose the magic of childhood?
When do we realize
we no longer know how
to play?
That people aren't always kind?
That the universe can spin out of our control
and leave us shattered
and 
disillusioned?
When our rose colored glasses
fall away for the last time
and rainbows
don't end
in pots of gold?
When does Creation
become commonplace
and we no longer take the time
to see its wonders
with the eyes of a child?
Where does the essence of who 
we truly are
disappear to?
And why does it have to go?

6 comments:

Steadfast Ahoy! said...

I think for some of us, that never happens--those eternal optimists. For others, it happens by age 7. I don't think the essence of who we truly are ever leaves us, but gets buried under delusion, fear, rejection, pain. Our true selves are ever with us, waiting to be rekindled by faith, hope, grace, mercy and LOVE.
Rosemary

MissKris said...

I am so thankful, for myself, that I've never lost it. And my grandsons have brought it to the surface again. There's nothing like playing WWE wrestling matches with a 3 and 5 year old! :-)

Laurie said...

I agree. Playing with my grandson definitely brings back the kid in me. Just sitting on the floor and looking at things through his perspective makes me smile. Tonight he kept toddling over to my curtain and peeking out from behind. What a blessing to see "wonders with the eyes of a child!"

Rob-bear said...

I can't say I'm very optimistic. But I am hopeful, about many things.

LC said...

Kris and Laurie, I concur about the power of grandkids to reawaken the sense of wonder, play and excitement about things that have come to seem ordinary.

Pat said...

This is beautiful. It reminds me of the poignancy in Peter, Paul and Mary's song, "Puff the Magic Dragon." Before I had children I thought it was a cute song. But now that my children are all grown up it brings a tear to my eyes. I enjoyed seeing the wonders of creation through my children's eyes when they were young. Now I can do that through my grandchildren's eyes.